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The forgotten flight : terrorism, diplomacy and the pursuit of justice
2017
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On Sept. 19, 1989, a suitcase bomb exploded on UTA Flight 772 en route to Paris from N'Djamena, Chad. The DC-10 crashed in Niger's Ténéré Desert, killing all 170 people on board. Six Libyans were implicated in the heinous terrorist act, but the machinations of French President Jacques Chirac and Libyan leader Moammar al-Gadhafi yielded only convictions in absentia and a paltry settlement for the families of the victims. The world took little note of this chilling tragedy, coming as it did nine months after the Lockerbie bombing, which claimed bigger headlines as well as U.S. and U.K. involvement. Newberger, a Washington, D.C., attorney who had gained stature as a terrorism-victims litigator, attracted the attention of the owner of the ill-fated UTA aircraft. Their case set in motion a barrage of legal and diplomatic wrangling to secure a settlement for the American families of the UTA victims. Newberger deftly breaks down the diplomatic flourishes and political motivations of the four countries involved in a complex web of determining culpability for state-sponsored terrorism. This is an engrossing and approachable narrative that skillfully distills the intricacies of this niche of international law and sensitively conveys the sorrows of the loved ones seeking a measure of justice. (June)

Copyright 2017 Publisher Weekly.

Annotations

On 19 September 1989, 170 people were killed when French Airlines UTA Flight 772 was destroyed by a suitcase bomb while en route from Chad to Paris. Despite being one of the deadliest acts of terrorism in history, it remained overshadowed by the Lockerbie tragedy that had taken place ten months earlier. Both attacks were carried out at the instruction of Libyan dictator Qaddafi, but while “Lockerbie” became synonymous with international terrorism, UTA 772 became the “forgotten flight”.

As a lawyer, Stuart H. Newberger represented the families of the seven Americans killed in the UTA 772 attack. Now he brings all the pieces together to tell its story for the first time, revealing in riveting prose how French investigators cracked the case and taking us inside the courtroom to witness the litigation against the Libyan state that followed. In the age of globalization, The Forgotten Flight provides a fascinating insight into the pursuit of justice across international borders. - (Perseus Publishing)

On 19 September 1989, 170 people were killed when French Airlines UTA Flight 772 was destroyed by a suitcase bomb while en route from Chad to Paris. Despite being one of the deadliest acts of terrorism in history, it remained overshadowed by the Lockerbie tragedy that had taken place ten months earlier. Both attacks were carried out at the instruction of Libyan dictator Qaddafi, but while 'Lockerbie' became synonymous with international terrorism, UTA 772 became the 'forgotten flight'.

As a lawyer, Stuart H. Newberger represented the families of the seven Americans killed in the UTA 772 attack. Now he brings all the pieces together to tell its story for the first time, revealing in riveting prose how French investigators cracked the case and taking us inside the courtroom to witness the litigation against the Libyan state that followed. In the age of globalization, The Forgotten Flight provides a fascinating insight into the pursuit of justice across international borders. - (Simon and Schuster)

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