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Washington's immortals : the untold story of an elite regiment who changed the course of the revolution
2016
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Publishers Weekly Reviews

Military historian O'Donnell (First SEALs) turns from his usual focus on WWII to examine the Revolutionary War, following the fortunes of a Maryland regiment of Washington's Army. The Marylanders played a key role in battles throughout the conflict, from the 1776 Battle of Brooklyn to the British defeat at the 1781 Battle of Yorktown. O'Donnell skillfully views the long-term strategies of the opposing generals in the context of the yearly ebb and flow of the war while conveying with immediacy the chaotic back-and-forth of individual battles. He also adeptly provides noteworthy thumbnails of both minor and major players, including American and British generals as well as ranking officers and the soldiers who shouldered the brunt of battle. Although O'Donnell writes from the American perspective, he objectively evaluates how the corps of both sides navigated the accouterments of war, injury, betrayal, reversals, and hardship, with credits given and criticisms made regardless of uniform. Surprisingly, O'Donnell manages to build a sense of drama as the war progresses, and though the writing can be stiff, readers with an interest in the Revolutionary period and military history generally will find this interesting and informative. Maps & illus. Agent: Andrew Zack, the Zack Company. (Mar.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2016 PWxyz LLC

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A best-selling military historian, drawing on extensive original sources, from letters to diaries to pension applications, pieces together the lives of the 256 brave men “who fell in the Battle of Brooklyn” in August 1776, saving General George Washington and his army, revealing their friendships, loves, defeats and triumphs. - (Baker & Taylor)

Draws on extensive original sources, from letters to diaries to pension applications, to piece together the lives of the 256 "Maryland Heroes" who died in the Battle of Brooklyn in August 1776, saving George Washington and the Continental Army. - (Baker & Taylor)

In August 1776, little over a month after the Continental Congress had formally declared independence from Britain, the revolution was on the verge of a sudden and disastrous end. General George Washington found his troops outmanned and outmaneuvered at the Battle of Brooklyn, and it looked like there was no escape. But thanks to a series of desperate rear guard attacks by a single heroic regiment, famously known as the “Immortal 400," Washington was able to evacuate his men and the nascent Continental Army lived to fight another day.

Today, only a modest, rusted and scarred metal sign near a dilapidated auto garage marks the mass grave where the bodies of the “Maryland Heroes' lie—256 men “who fell in the Battle of Brooklyn.' In Washington's Immortals, best-selling military historian Patrick K. O'Donnell brings to life the forgotten story of this remarkable band of brothers. Known as “gentlemen of honour, family, and fortune," they fought not just in Brooklyn, but in key battles including Trenton, Princeton, Camden, Cowpens, Guilford Courthouse, and Yorktown, where their heroism changed the course of the war.

Drawing on extensive original sources, from letters to diaries to pension applications, O'Donnell pieces together the stories of these brave men—their friendships, loves, defeats, and triumphs. He explores their arms and tactics, their struggles with hostile loyalists and shortages of clothing and food, their development into an elite unit, and their dogged opponents, including British General Lord Cornwallis. And through the prism of this one group, O'Donnell tells the larger story of the Revolutionary War. Washington's Immortals is gripping and inspiring boots-on-the-ground history, sure to appeal to a wide readership.
- (Perseus Publishing)

In August 1776, little over a month after the Continental Congress had formally declared independence from Britain, the revolution was on the verge of a sudden and disastrous end. General George Washington found his troops outmanned and outmaneuvered at the Battle of Brooklyn, and it looked like there was no escape. But thanks to a series of desperate rear guard attacks by a single heroic regiment, famously known as the “Immortal 400,” Washington was able to evacuate his men and the nascent Continental Army lived to fight another day.

Today, only a modest, rusted and scarred metal sign near a dilapidated auto garage marks the mass grave where the bodies of the “Maryland Heroes” lie—256 men “who fell in the Battle of Brooklyn.” In Washington’s Immortals, best-selling military historian Patrick K. O’Donnell brings to life the forgotten story of this remarkable band of brothers. Known as “gentlemen of honour, family, and fortune,” they fought not just in Brooklyn, but in key battles including Trenton, Princeton, Camden, Cowpens, Guilford Courthouse, and Yorktown, where their heroism changed the course of the war.

Drawing on extensive original sources, from letters to diaries to pension applications, O’Donnell pieces together the stories of these brave men—their friendships, loves, defeats, and triumphs. He explores their arms and tactics, their struggles with hostile loyalists and shortages of clothing and food, their development into an elite unit, and their dogged opponents, including British General Lord Cornwallis. And through the prism of this one group, O’Donnell tells the larger story of the Revolutionary War. Washington’s Immortals is gripping and inspiring boots-on-the-ground history, sure to appeal to a wide readership.
- (Perseus Publishing)

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