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The Battle of the Bulge : the photographic history of an American triumph
2009
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Among the most famous battles that American forces fought in World War II, the Battle of the Bulge helped define the U.S. soldier in the “Good War.” The sheer scale of destruction--with almost as many American soldiers killed during the battle’s 39 days as in all 80 days of the D-day and the ensuing Normandy campaign--continues to occupy military historians and veterans with endless speculation about what happened and what might have.

This photographic history recreates the triumph of American arms against the vaunted Nazi war machine's desperate "all in" attack--a victory that significantly shortened World War II in Europe and saved most of Western Europe from the Soviets.In harrowing images, the book revisits the only destruction of an American division in Europe in World War II--the 106th Infantry Division, which suffered almost all of its casualties in the first three days of the battle.It shows the air forces, armored forces, and infantry on both sides thrown into the Bulge—nearly a million men in a meat grinder of terrible ferocity.Included is the most famous atrocity committed against Americans in Europe during the war: the Malmedy Massacre in a grim photographic record.

Battle of the Bulge is a brilliant pictorial account of one of the greatest battles of all time, this book is a lasting tribute and testament to American might in the fight against tyranny.

- (Grand Central Pub)

Among the most famous battles that American forces fought in World War II, the Battle of the Bulge helped define the U.S. soldier in the “Good War.” The sheer scale of destruction--with almost as many American soldiers killed during the battle’s 39 days as in all 80 days of the D-day and the ensuing Normandy campaign--continues to occupy military historians and veterans with endless speculation about what happened and what might have.

This photographic history recreates the triumph of American arms against the vaunted Nazi war machine's desperate "all in" attack--a victory that significantly shortened World War II in Europe and saved most of Western Europe from the Soviets. In harrowing images, the book revisits the only destruction of an American division in Europe in World War II--the 106th Infantry Division, which suffered almost all of its casualties in the first three days of the battle. It shows the air forces, armored forces, and infantry on both sides thrown into the Bulge—nearly a million men in a meat grinder of terrible ferocity. Included is the most famous atrocity committed against Americans in Europe during the war: the Malmedy Massacre in a grim photographic record.

Battle of the Bulge is a brilliant pictorial account of one of the greatest battles of all time, this book is a lasting tribute and testament to American might in the fight against tyranny.

- (Mbi Pub Co)

A photographic history of the triumph of American arms against the vaunted Nazi war machine's desperate "all in" attack in one of history’s greatest battles.

- (Mbi Pub Co)

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It took the Allies most of the summer, but they shattered the German defenses on the Western Front. Now they just needed to follow it up and catch the fleeing Nazi army before it could reach the haven of the Siegfried Line. This was the German version of the Maginot Line, a series of concrete bunkers, pillboxes, anti-tank ditches, and minefields that defended the Third Reich’s western frontier. If the remains of the Fifth Panzer Army and the Seventh Army could get behind these defenses, it could earn Germany a reprieve from total defeat. The infantry and panzer divisions could regroup, replace their losses, and rebuild behind the safety of this defensive belt. The Allies would be unable to end the war quickly, and maybe a stand on the Siegfried line would hold up the American and British armored columns long enough for Hitler’s wonder weapons—rockets, buzz bombs, and jet fighters—to tilt the balance of power in Germany’s favor.

Tens of thousands of lives lay at stake. The race was on.

—from Chapter 1: “Hitler’s Deadly Gamble”

- (Mbi Pub Co)

The Nazi offensive into Belgium in December 1944 was a last-ditch gamble by Hitler that caught the Allies by surprise. Only the willingness of Americans to stand and die prevented the German breakthrough that might have prolonged the war.

The Battle of the Bulge ranks as the single largest battle ever fought by the United States Army. More men, vehicles, supplies, equipment, aircraft, and effort went into this battle than into any other in American history. It was larger than Gettysburg, larger than the Gulf War, larger than the landings in Normandy that ignited the fuse that carried the army halfway across Europe to the bloodstained snow of the Ardennes.

Air forces, armored forces, and elite troops on both sides were thrown into the Bulge—nearly a million men. Thirty-one American divisions—fully a third of the U.S. Army raised during World War II—saw action in this battle. In thirty-nine days (December 16 to January 25) nineteen thousand Americans were killed in the Bulge—almost as many as in the eighty days of fighting in the D-Day invasion and Normandy hedgerows. The only American division destroyed in Europe in World War II, the 106th Infantry Division, suffered almost all of its casualties in just three days at the start of the battle, losing two of its three infantry regiments to the Nazi onslaught.

The Battle of the Bulge is the story of a generation of draftees, National Guardsmen, and a small core of regular officers and NCOs. It is the story of men frozen and hurting as snow piled around their foxholes and artillery splintered the woods that gave them shelter. Their efforts played a vital role in defeating Hitler’s final offensive and bringing to an end the terrible reign of the Third Reich.

- (Mbi Pub Co)

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